Values and Preferences Assessments

Everyone possesses a unique set of values and preferences.  Not only do these values and preferences influence one’s decision to become a caregiver/not become a caregiver, they also have the ability to influence ones: approach to caregiving; decisions made during caregiving; the priority one gives to caregiving; and satisfaction with care.  Values and preferences are, however, individualistic, and attempts to influence them might not only be futile, they may be considered unethical.  It is important, however, to have a sense of a caregiver’s preferences and values.  For example, it can help those around understand why a caregiver is behaving in a particular manner.  Furthermore, this understanding may provide clues as to how a caregiver may respond when faced with particular challenges in terms of decisions and tasks.  There have been a number of instruments developed to measure values and preferences in relation to such areas as decision-making, culture, willingness to care, and institutionalization.

Caregiving Satisfaction Scale

  • Measures long-term satisfaction and the rewards of caregiving.
  • 15 items (4-point scale)
  • Strawbridge, W. J. (1991). The effects of social factors on adult children caring for older parents. University of Washington.

Carer Satisfaction

  • Measures caregiver satisfaction with services for stroke patients related to in-patient services and services after discharge.
  • 9 items (4-point scale)
  • Pound, P., Gompertz, P., & Ebrahim, S. (1993). Development and results of a questionnaire to measure carer satisfaction after stroke. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 47, 500-505.

Community Service Attitudes Inventory

  • Measures 5 domains of attitudes toward community services: concern for opinions of others, confidence in service system, preference for informal care, belief in caregiver independence, and acceptance of government services.
  • 25 items (4-point scale)
  • Collins, C., Stommel, M., King, S., & Given, C. W. (1991). Assessment of the attitudes of family caregivers toward community services. The Gerontologist, 31, 756-761.

Cultural Justifications Scale

  • Measures cultural reasons why families provide care to the elderly.
  • 10 items (4-point scale)
  • Dilworth-Anderson, P., & Marshall, S. (1996). Social support in its cultural context. In G. R. Pierce & B. R. Sarason (Eds.), Handbook of social support and the family. New York, NY: Plenum Press.

Community Service Attitudes Inventory

  • Measures 5 domains of attitudes toward community services: concern for opinions of others, confidence in service system, preference for informal care, belief in caregiver independence, and acceptance of government services.
  • 25 items (4-point scale)
  • Collins, C., Stommel, M., King, S., & Given, C. W. (1991). Assessment of the attitudes of family caregivers toward community services. The Gerontologist, 31, 756-761.

Cultural Justifications Scale

  • Measures cultural reasons why families provide care to the elderly.
  • 10 items (4-point scale)
  • Dilworth-Anderson, P., & Marshall, S. (1996). Social support in its cultural context. In G. R. Pierce & B. R. Sarason (Eds.), Handbook of social support and the family. New York, NY: Plenum Press.

Desire to Institutionalize

  • Measures the desire of the caregiver to institutionalize the care recipient.
  • 6 items (2-point scale)
  • Morycz, R. K. (1985). Caregiving strain and the desire to institutionalize family members with Alzheimer’s disease: Possible predictors and model development. Research on Aging, 7, 329-361.

Factors Influencing Placement Decision

  • Measures the reasons a caregiver decides to move their relative to a care facility.
  • 19 items (4-point scale)
  • Aneshensel, C. S., Pearlin, L. I., Mullan, J. T., Zarit, S., & Whitlatch, C. J. (1995). Profiles in caregiving: The unexpected career. San Diego: Academic Press.

FAMCARE

  • Measures satisfaction with quality of care provided at end of life.
  • 20 items (5-point scale)
  • http://www.mywhatever.com/cifwriter/content/41/pe1277.html
  • Kristjanson, L. J., Sloan, J. A., Dudgeon, D., & Adaskin, E. (1996). Family members’ perceptions of palliative cancer care: Predictors of family functioning and family members’ health. Journal of Palliative Care, 12(4), 10-20.

Informed Decision Making

  • Measures the degree to which the caregiver perceives specific types of information helpful to the decision-making process.
  • 18 items (3-point scale)
  • Fortinsky, R. H., & Hathaway, T. J. (1990). Information and service needs among active and former family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s Disease. The Gerontologist, 30, 604-609.

Nursing Home Stressors

  • Measures 3 domains of nursing home stressors: nursing assistants’ communication with family, nursing assistants’ support for families, and measures of positive and negative interactions.
  • 6 items for nursing assistants’ communication with residents’ family, 5 items for nursing assistants’ support for families, and 10 items for measures of positive and negative interactions (3-point scales)
  • Whitlatch, C. J., Schur, D., Noelker, L. S., Ejaz, F. K., & Looman, W. J. (2001). The stress process of family caregiving in institutional settings. The Gerontologist, 41, 462-473.

Quality of Care Scale

  • Measures caregiver perceptions of quality of care.
  • 6 items (4-point scale)
  • Bass, D. M., Noelker, L. S., & McCarthy, C. A. (1999). The inflence of formal and informal helpers on primary caregivers’ perceptions of quality of care. The Journal of Applied Gerontology, 18, 177-200.

The AIDS Caregiver Scale

  • Measures both personal satisfaction and stress associated with caring for someone with AIDS.
  • 14 items (7-point scale)
  • Ferrari, J. R., McCown, W., & Pantano, J. (1993). Experiencing satisfaction and stress as an AIDS care provider: The AIDS Caregiver Scale. Evaluation & the Health Professions, 16, 295-310.

Values and Preferences Scale

  • Measures both caregiver and care recipient values and preferences for care in relation to environment, social interaction, autonomy, self-identity, and family caregiver issues.
  • 37 items (3-point scale)
  • McCullough, L. B., Wilson, N. L., Teasdale, T. T., Kolpakchi, A. L., & Skelly, J. R. (1993). Mapping personal, familial and professional values in long term care decisions. The Gerontologist, 33, 324-332.

Willingness to Care Scale

  • Measures the experiences of informal caregivers for persons living with AIDS and their attitudes towards providing emotional, instrumental, and nursing support.
  • 30 items (5-point scale)
  • Abell, N. (2001). Assessing willingness to care for persons with AIDS: Validation of a new measure. Research on Social Work Practice, 11, 118-130.

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