Relationship with Care Receiver

Relationship with Care Receiver

The relationship of caregiver to a care receiver has also been shown to influence the extent to which interventions will be effective or not.  In particular, spousal caregivers and children caregivers, while sharing similar needs also have distinct challenges and needs that are important to consider when determining types of interventions.  Kang (2006), found that predictors of caregiver emotional strain shared between adult children and spouses included “care recipients’ disruptive behaviour, caregiver’s perceived overload, family disagreement, limitations on the caregiver’s life, and utilization of personal coping strategies by the caregiver” however ‘race’ of the care recipient and availability of respite uniquely predicted adult caregiver strain. In terms of specific interventions, adult children caregivers were found to respond more favourably to counseling and education interventions than older spousal caregivers. (Schoenmaker et al., 2010).  Whilst having a primary caregiver may be common, there are often many individuals involved in the provision of care. As such interventions need to recognize that a ‘constellation’ of caregivers may exist with multiple individuals participating in the care and the decision making process for care. The presence of multiple voices can add to the complexity of a caregiving situation such that caregivers may experience stress not only from the challenging behaviours of a care recipient but also from negotiating the other participants in the care giver role.

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